Content Research

The museum will be split up into various sections, of different factual information. This allows the visitor to get real insight of what a Whalers life was really like. Images on the wall will turn into animated scenes on the iPad, there will be questions about the images. Interior of the museum will be dimly lit, with lights focusing on the actual content for the visited to see, this will create a much more immersive experience. Changing the boat within the museum to allow it to move and have people sit inside it, whilst wearing virtual reality headsets will create a truly realistic experience that is not only factual but visual.  The flow of the content will move through a Whalers life, showing the tools he used, his life on the ship, people you came across on his journey and other exotic animals he so along the way.

This is the information that is viewable when looking at the various animals around the exhibition;

Geographic distribution
Images
Bone/ muscle skin Layers
Communication
Amount of people who have signed the petition/percentage of number of people who like whales
scale of the animal in com[parison to other animals
Life expectancy
Diet = Carnivore/Herbivore
Weight
Population

Timeline
6,000 BC – The earliest archaeological record of whaling is found inSouth Korea, where carved drawings dating back to6,000 BC show that Stone Age people hunted whales using boats and spears.

9TH CENTURY – Whaling begins in Norway, France and Spain.

12TH CENTURY – Hand harpooning begins in Japan.

1848 – The exploding harpoon is invented. The harpoon was fired with a cannon and used a motorized whale catcher. This enabled whalers to catch the fast-moving and huge rorqual whales.

1930 – 80 per cent of the great whale species are thought to be on the verge of extinction.

1946 – The International Whaling Commission (IWC)is set up by15 whaling nations to manage whale stocks.

1963 – The UK ceases whaling.

1972 – The population of blue whales falls to 6,000.

1990 – Seven out of the nine remaining whaling nations agree to stop whaling.

2003 – Iceland resumes ‘scientific whaling’.

2006 – Iceland resumes commercial whaling.

Boats
“Thar She Blows!”
Fin Whale
Antarctic Minkle Whale
Sperm Whale
Humpback Whale
Sei Whale

The captain
The mates
ATE TOGETHER AND BEST Accommodation BEST SLEEPING QUARTER

The boat steerers
The foremast hands
ATE LAST – WORST SLEEPING Quarters

Length of journey
The whaling schooner, the smallest whaler, generally undertook 6-month voyages
brigs, barks, and ships might be at sea for three or four years

Right whale – Carnivorous
(SCALE)
Population

Weapons
Harpoon
Fired in then bent with pressure

Lance
cut the meat

Polar Bear – Omnivorous
ABOUT ERIC THE BEAR
1981 – 22,000
1993 – 25,000
1997 – 24,000
2001 – 23,000
2005 – 22,000
2009 – 20,000
2013 – 18,000

2015-12-19 16.21.11 2015-12-19 16.21.17

References;

https://www.rspca.org.uk/servlet/Satellite?blobcol=urlblob&blobheader=application%2Fpdf&blobkey=id&blobtable=RSPCABlob&blobwhere=1195662481324&ssbinary=true

http://www.whalingmuseum.org/learn/research-topics/overview-of-north-american-whaling/life-aboard

http://www.whalecraft.net/Harpoons.html

http://mysite.du.edu/~ttyler/ploughboy/olmstedvoyage.htm
http://www.whalingmuseum.org/learn/research-topics/overview-of-north-american-whaling/life-aboard

http://nibbler.silktide.com/

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