Content Research

The museum will be split up into various sections, of different factual information. This allows the visitor to get real insight of what a Whalers life was really like. Images on the wall will turn into animated scenes on the iPad, there will be questions about the images. Interior of the museum will be dimly lit, with lights focusing on the actual content for the visited to see, this will create a much more immersive experience. Changing the boat within the museum to allow it to move and have people sit inside it, whilst wearing virtual reality headsets will create a truly realistic experience that is not only factual but visual.  The flow of the content will move through a Whalers life, showing the tools he used, his life on the ship, people you came across on his journey and other exotic animals he so along the way.

This is the information that is viewable when looking at the various animals around the exhibition;

Geographic distribution
Images
Bone/ muscle skin Layers
Communication
Amount of people who have signed the petition/percentage of number of people who like whales
scale of the animal in com[parison to other animals
Life expectancy
Diet = Carnivore/Herbivore
Weight
Population

Timeline
6,000 BC – The earliest archaeological record of whaling is found inSouth Korea, where carved drawings dating back to6,000 BC show that Stone Age people hunted whales using boats and spears.

9TH CENTURY – Whaling begins in Norway, France and Spain.

12TH CENTURY – Hand harpooning begins in Japan.

1848 – The exploding harpoon is invented. The harpoon was fired with a cannon and used a motorized whale catcher. This enabled whalers to catch the fast-moving and huge rorqual whales.

1930 – 80 per cent of the great whale species are thought to be on the verge of extinction.

1946 – The International Whaling Commission (IWC)is set up by15 whaling nations to manage whale stocks.

1963 – The UK ceases whaling.

1972 – The population of blue whales falls to 6,000.

1990 – Seven out of the nine remaining whaling nations agree to stop whaling.

2003 – Iceland resumes ‘scientific whaling’.

2006 – Iceland resumes commercial whaling.

Boats
“Thar She Blows!”
Fin Whale
Antarctic Minkle Whale
Sperm Whale
Humpback Whale
Sei Whale

The captain
The mates
ATE TOGETHER AND BEST Accommodation BEST SLEEPING QUARTER

The boat steerers
The foremast hands
ATE LAST – WORST SLEEPING Quarters

Length of journey
The whaling schooner, the smallest whaler, generally undertook 6-month voyages
brigs, barks, and ships might be at sea for three or four years

Right whale – Carnivorous
(SCALE)
Population

Weapons
Harpoon
Fired in then bent with pressure

Lance
cut the meat

Polar Bear – Omnivorous
ABOUT ERIC THE BEAR
1981 – 22,000
1993 – 25,000
1997 – 24,000
2001 – 23,000
2005 – 22,000
2009 – 20,000
2013 – 18,000

2015-12-19 16.21.11 2015-12-19 16.21.17

References;

https://www.rspca.org.uk/servlet/Satellite?blobcol=urlblob&blobheader=application%2Fpdf&blobkey=id&blobtable=RSPCABlob&blobwhere=1195662481324&ssbinary=true

http://www.whalingmuseum.org/learn/research-topics/overview-of-north-american-whaling/life-aboard

http://www.whalecraft.net/Harpoons.html

http://mysite.du.edu/~ttyler/ploughboy/olmstedvoyage.htm
http://www.whalingmuseum.org/learn/research-topics/overview-of-north-american-whaling/life-aboard

http://nibbler.silktide.com/

IMPROVEMENTS TO BE MADE TO THE EXHIBITON

There are many improvements that me made to both the overall museum experience and specifically the one concerning whaling, I have described below the ideas that are both originally mine and also researched.

OUTDOORS
– Use outdoor building projection to project an underwater world to life.
– In the evening reactionary projections can be made onto the floor. This could allow people to look under their feet have the water react with their steps?
– Use holographic projections to mark every hour, the captain will shout “watch whale ahead”.
– Model boat outside with actor standing on top

INDOORS
– Allow the users to pick their topic first, and the level at which they want to learn (relate these with the 4 classes from research social, intellectual, emotional or spiritual?). This will directly impact the route they are given and the amount of information provided.
– Augmented reality can bring elements of the exhibition to life and add extra information about these things that can be explored (point a camera at the whale skeleton, the skin would appear on it, it would pop up as a 3D which can show the different elements within the animal, like skeleton, organs, muscles and skin. This will also have a more info button to allow you to compare the animal in size to other piscine creatures, it’s life expectancy, YOY breed estimations, are they endangered? It could also be used to scale the animal against other animals associated with it.(Use black & white for contrast on live camera, while the content that can be interacted with is in colour – example of this contrast working is http://latenightedm.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/alison_wonderland_run-new-edm-music.jpg)
– A mood board of a looped video of a whale user enhanced adaptations on each frame, see this music video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nntGTK2Fhb0) and pause anywhere after 1:06 and notice it is all individual artwork (Also see image below). This creates a social bond between all visitors, old, new and future.

bieber
– Let the user know that there are more exhibitions to see if they were to visit again, it also suggests other places of interested around the city.
– In app voice commands (like Siri) could allow users to ask a specific question about the animal and get it answered immediately. These questions could be targeted at the stories fictional captain by saying “Hey Captain”
– A boat radar should be used for location within the museum relation to interactive elements, when clicked showing the floor plan of the museum and all the interactive elements across the museum.
– Sea biscuits as snacks should placed along the route for people to eat (Info about the Weevil)

EXTRA
– Moby Dick swallowed a whaler. (Could be the story in which the users travel the museum) & can be related to the outdoor hologram of the whale jumping from the ground on the hour.
– Visitor Number #9172/competition(With spending money for the gift store)
– Link with Facebook for competitions, and allowing the user to save information they want to read another time,or allow them to access saved information at their next visit? (Data collection & Improvement of services for user)
– Choice of Language
– Time sensitive responsiveness (Good morning/Good Afternoon)

Current Online Exhibits & Target Audiences

(http://www.warmuseum.ca/war-of-1812/) This site is very straightforward, it combines simple graphics with last colours and small amounts of text. This website is somewhat interactive but almost seems confusing as you don’t really know what different sections are for. The footer for this page stands out really nicely as it is a lighter flat colour, that contains four elements, a quote, social interaction & two logos. While It doesn’t try and sell you something because it is just a virtual exhibition, there is still less content that other sites for actual exhibitions.

1

(http://amhistory.si.edu/militaryhistory/exhibition/flash.html) Is a really good website, complete with information, graphics, animations and interactivity it allows for a good user experience. There is a lot of clickable content but this can almost seem cluttered and somewhat turns it into a bad user experience. Typography and colours seem to have been seriously considered when making this site, each war has it’s own style and colour set but stays with the same general theme. I believe that because there is so much content available that it wouldn’t intrigue the user to want to visit the actual museum/gallery itself. The content of the site actually tells the entire story along with photographs of the artefacts that you would usually go to the gallery to visit, this makes a trip to the gallery almost pointless unless you particularly wanted to see it in person.
2

(http://www.nam.ac.uk/exhibitions/online-exhibitions/waacs-war) This website is very straightforward, it is all contained within one page, if you want more content you simply click on another number along the bar and it will slide across. The colours are simple and flat, which allows the user to focus on the content. I found this to boring and dull, and I think this was due to its simplicity and lack of interactivity.

3

(http://www.moma.org/interactives/exhibitions/2013/isagenzken/) I really liked this website for it’s overall design. There is great interactivity with the menu where it is out of sight until you click on it and it becomes fullscreen, the are different colours which change and become boxed in if you hover over them. This is simple and effective as it then stands out of the crowd and because something you enjoy using. Each page is dedicated to a different part of the exhibition which works really well because the majority of text is one page whilst the images are contained on another meaning the user can view what they want.

4

The target audience for a museum is very diverse, it attracts people from all ages, genders and class. This means defining the target audience is very difficult,

In terms of creating an exhibition site for a museum i know I need to focus my attention on attracting new customers without alienating existing customers, this can be done and I found the “Marketing of Art Museums” by  Robert C. Blattberg and Cynthia J. Broderick that explains a lot of relevant information. This article dates back to 1991 and so is out of date with the web now in place on desktops, tablets and mobiles, this shouldn’t be an issue as some of the key concepts will still apply.

“There are two distinct types of audiences that art museums can target. The first is the group of potential donors, who often become members and are more likely to become heavily involved in museum activities. This group is small, will generate far more revenue and profits to the museum, and appreciates the current types of exhibits the museum offers.

The second type of audience is the general public, who attend museums to be entertained and to be educated. Few will ever become donors of works of arts nor will they become major financial benefactors. However, they occasionally become members and often spend money at the museum store and restaurant.”

From this statement, it is easy to understand that there multiple benefits a museum can take from their audience. These are donors of material and people who are willing to participate in events for the museum, this can be done through volunteer work. Also, more commonly the general public who spend money in the shop and cafe, I must be targeting the design of the site cause enough intrigue for people to want to visit the museum.

Therefore, understanding who the target audience is vital and while I am mean’t be basing my website around an exhibition some sites are simply to inspire action against a particular organisation. I would like to do both, meaning the viewer is intrigued enough to visit the exhibition but also then wants to do something about what they have seen. This will capitalise on every single person that first views the page. They view the page, pay for the exhibition, fight for the cause of the exhibition and then also further spread the word about the exhibition. This would be the most profitable, attention gaining, way for an exhibition to gain traction with the public by creating a ‘movement’ that has the purpose of both profitable gain and creating awareness.

References:

http://www.nber.org/chapters/c11646.pdf

http://www.copywritematters.com.au/define-target-market/